2017 Honda Ridgeline – Test Drive, Review, Ratings, Spec

SAMSUNG CSC

An Ironically Civilized Pickup

Despite tipping the weightscale into the 4500lbs weight class while spanning its chassis dimensions into the midsize pickup category, the 2017 Honda Ridgeline somehow retains a charasmatic driving experience that cherishes the Honda’s smooth powertrain.  Though not as well conceived as a rugged pickup in both the import and domsetic market, the Ridgeli still holds its ground strong.

Don’t be fooled by it’s basic visual form though. The Honda Ridgeline’s got some slick truck bed design features that goes beyond that of a conventional pickup. For example, there is no wheel wells to improve cargo space, an available 150/400W power outlet for power tools or tailgating, a lockable, 7.3 cu. ft. hidden trunk bed with a drain plug for storing ice or wet gear, and even an available audio system built in for outdoor audio entertainment. The tailgate even opens from swinging outwards from the side in addition to folding downwards.

SAMSUNG CSC

Keeping Looks Simple

Exterior design is kept discrete and basic. Other than standard LED headlights, the overall shape and design resembles that of a simple but functional pickup that more or less follows the genetic trend of the Honda bloodline. Not that it looks boring though. There’s still plenty of design elements especially its front fascia that give the Honda Ridgeline a distinctive look. But compared to its competitors including the Toyota Tacoma, or Nissan Titan, the Ridgeline falls over more to the bland side of the scale.

SAMSUNG CSC

Interior continues to follow a simple and clean layout. Our tester model comes equipped with leather seats that provide plenty of good. And if it works, why change it? The Honda Ridgeline interior borrows more or less the same interior design of its smaller Accord sibling and enlarges it to fit within the Ridgeline cabin space. There is no shortage of room space in the front and rear seats continue to provide plenty of space and comfort as well.

A Surprisingly Civilized Truck

Trucks are generally large, loud and clunky to drive, but in the case of the Honda Ridgeline, its drive was surprisingly quiet, smooth and generslly easy to maneuver and even almost comparable  to the Accord. And that is thanked by its unibody chassis construction to improve stiffness and its Honda i-Vtec V6 engine.

SAMSUNG CSC

Speaking of engine, there is only one choice to choose from across all its models, and that’s a 3.5l V6 iVtec engine capable of producing
280 horsepower and 262 lbs.ft of torque and a standard 6 speed automatic transmission. Power train options include either a 2WD or 4WD system.

There’s no escaping the fact that the Honda Ridgeline’s got a lot of weight to haul around; still, the available torque provides no shortage of power for acceleration off standstill, but does noticasbly saturate on highway speed.

Towing capacity is rated in at 3500 lbs for its FWD model while it’s AWD version can tow an additional 1500 lbs. And its truck bed can carry 1584 lbs. That comes close to the Nissan Titan and outscores the Toyota Tacoma’s standard towing capacity by 1500 lbs. The base price can be had for $29,475 for the standard FWD model. Adding $1800 adds AWD capability, totalling to just 31,275. That’s not a bad price for full pickup functionality.

SAMSUNG CSC

It’s clear that the Honda Ridgeline was built to suit the off road and heavy duty workforce needs. While its looks are bland, it still retains a modern and refreshing look. But what gives it the upper hand is its smoth and silky ride that rivals that of most pickup trucks that simply doesn’t compare.